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March 2008
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Eave Repair

This is an eave needing repair. The damage is called ‘dryrot’, which is a misnomer as water was the culprit.
Eave1

The damage came from the foam roofing failure from above. This is a weird problem as most foamed roofs are monolithic structures and holes are not usually this large nor pervasive.
Eave2

The solution begins with cutting out the bad areas, slightly undercutting them, and applying spray foam. While that is drying, we work on the underside,
Eave3

We chisel out the rotted areas, and rebuild the wood with bondo all purpose putty, which is just like the plastic bondo that they use to repair cars. There is the putty and the creme hardener. It works like a thick hot mud, and sets up quickly. It is waterproof, rot proof, and you have a small window while it is curing to use a cheese grater type buffer to remove large material.

Note: This is an appearance and not a structural repair.

Eave4

Back on the roof we saw off the excess material with a serrated blade bread knife, apply a coat of quality caulk and in this case re-coat the roof.
Eave5

Moving back to the eave, we scrape, sand, prime the repair , caulk and repaint.
Eave6